Recovery Coaching Why Are We Here Series

This training is traveling around to many Recovery Centers in NH:

June 23rd, White Horse Addiction Center; http://www.whitehorseac.com/

June 28th, Safe Harbor Recovery Center – Portsmouth; https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=safe%20harbor%20recovery%20center

June 29th, North Country Serenity Center; http://northcountryserenitycenter.org/

July 7th, GTFRC, Tilton; https://www.facebook.com/GTAFRC/

July 14th, Keene Serenity Center; https://www.facebook.com/Keene-Serenity-Center-245713058968823/

 

About this event

Bernadette Gleeson, trainer

This training will include a deep look at:

  • Our beliefs about what addiction and recovery are, as to make sure that our beliefs do not cause any unintended barriers to the people we serve
  • The role of a Recovery Coach (research/legitimacy on peer support and TRS)
  • Quick history of Recovery Movement/RCO’s/RCC’s (where does it all fit)
  • Numbers and research on recovery
  • True deep look at multiple pathways
  • ROSC, Recovery Capital, Recovery Management
  • Coaches role in building Recovery Capital

Goals of Training

  1. Build on foundational knowledge that was learned in RCA.
  2. Provide contextual and historical knowledge to where and how RCO’s/RCC’s fit in the movement, as well as the research/foundational legitimacy around peer support.
  3. Hone current acquired skills, and add new skills and tools to amplify and elevate the

RC’s/volunteers experiential expertise.

  1. Shift the way that we think about, feel about, interact with, and deliver services to people with SUDs and people in recovery.

Learning Objectives:

RC’s/volunteers will:

  1. Learn historical context and knowledge as it relates to the Recovery Movement and where/how RCO’s/RCC’s fit within the movement.
  2. Differentiate between the role of a RC and all other service providers.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of multiple pathways to/in/of recovery.
  4. Describe how/where RCO’s/RCC’s fit into Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care, what their role is in Recovery Management, and how to help recoverees build internal and external Recovery Capital.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the existing research on recovery.
  6. Define addiction and recovery in a way that the general public can understand – making sure that their language aligns with the possibility and probability of recovery with the right opportunities.
  7. Learn how to share their story from a place of light, and one that highlights how the general public can be an opportunity for people with SUDs to be alive in recovery.
  8. Practice repertoire of skills learned through completion of “journey work” at the end of each training – to be returned and evaluated by direct supervisor.

Quote for the Week

“Improve your memory – tell the truth.”

Toward the end of my drinking my memory got worse and worse.  To start with, my mind was a big blur from being constantly loaded, or from recovering from a blackout.  In addition, it got harder and harder to remember what story or excuse I had recently made up or who I had told what to.  Because my drinking had become the most important thing in my life I had begun lying to protect it, and because most of the lies and stories I made up were followed by a drinking binge, I couldn’t keep anything straight.  It’s no wonder people stopped hanging around me.
When I got sober and my head began to clear, I went right on lying and telling stories.  As I worked the Steps what I realized was that I was lying to protect my ego and get my own way.  I quickly found the truth in the statement that ‘self-centeredness and self-seeking’ was my natural state as an untreated alcoholic.  It took a lot of inventories and conversations with my sponsor before I was ready to get honest.  I also had to uncover, discover and discard a lot of character defects that were keeping me sick before I could fully recover.
​​​​​​​
Today my life is much easier now that my default is to just tell the truth.  I no longer feel the need to defend or construct a big story because today I’ve learned how to be responsible and honest.  Today I go through life looking for ways to be of service rather than to cheat or deceive.  It’s a wonderful feeling to be able to look someone in the eye again and feel a part of the human race.  And best of all, my memory has improved because today I tell the truth.
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DHHS Emergency Service Unit Issues Alert & Safety Instructions

carfentanil on Wednesday April 26th, following New Hampshire overdose deaths that have been linked to the substance. As a result, the NH Information & Analysis Center prepared a bulletin about carfentanil; UPDATE: The NH Information & Analysis Center issued an update describing the current trends surround carfentanil use in New Hampshire Adobe Acrobat Reader Symbol on May 23, 2017.

Carfentanil FlyerThe NH DHHS Emergency Services Unit has released a flyer with instructions Adobe Acrobat Reader Symbol on what to do if you’re exposed to carfentanil, as well as a flyer designed for first responders Adobe Acrobat Reader Symbol who might come in contact with it. In addition, the State epidemiologist has released a Health Alert Adobe Acrobat Reader Symbol on the deadly substance.

Gambler’s Anonymous meetings in NH

The current meetings in New Hampshire are: Tuesday 7PM Manchester  Easter Seals Bldg 555 Auburn St. Manchester and Thursday 7:30-9PM Hampstead at the Congregational Church 61 Main St (Route 121) Hampstead.